Category Archives: Health and Wellness

Being a Vegan is not Just for White Folks Only

The Invisible Vegan: A Movement Toward a New Consciousness poster with a green background and a black stylized fist grasping an orange carrot. In the lower left corner are the list of the featured performers'.

I recently made some changes to my meal plan and have moved more into a plant-based diet. This change surprisingly has not been too hard because fruits and vegetables are my jam. Even before I started working from home, I would take a salad to work just about every day for lunch. It would be filled with lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, broccoli and even green bell peppers and onions with a sprinkling of chopped nuts. My co-workers would be eyeballing my lunch as I quickly moved out of the break room and back to my office to eat my crunchy rainbow feast. So, when I heard about The Invisible Vegan documentary by Jasmine Leyva I just had to watch it. Now, before I give my two cents let me give you the summary.

Summary of Invisible Vegan Documentary

The documentary begins with the personal story of Jasmine Leyva, a 30-year-old black actress and filmmaker currently based in Los Angeles. Over the past seven years, Jasmine has committed herself to veganism, both in lifestyle and research. Taking Leyva’s unhealthy childhood growing up in Washington, DC as a point of departure, the film interweaves her narrative with the professional and personal experiences of a prominent group of vegan activists. The film integrates interviews with popular culture luminaries including Cedric the Entertainer (actor and comedian), John Salley (former NBA player and wellness advocate), and Clayton Gavin (aka Stic of the hip-hop duo Dead Prez).

The Invisible Vegan also explains how plant-based eating is directly linked to African roots and how African-American eating habits have been debased by a chain of oppression.

Africa, Slavery and Soul Food

AS I sat and watched the 90-minute film, I was nodding my head and saying, “Yes, that’s right, that’s right!” Sounding like people in the amen corner at church. She was speaking truth to power and I was not too surprised by nothing coming out of this young lady’s mouth. She started out explaining how a plant-based diet came from Africa and how it is not just for white folks. She ticked off the names of Civil rights activists who are vegetarians like the late Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, and Dick Gregory. She mentioned Angela Davis too. This was enlightening because I only knew about Dick Gregory as I had read about his diet plan before. He was a firm believer in better health just as much as in civil rights.

She talked about how our enslaved ancestors were forced to eat the scraps on the plantation. How they made meals out of the leftovers. Yes, this is so true. I remember reading the book Roots and many other slave narratives where scenes played out just like this.  Because of this situation Black people passed down this type of eating from generation to generation. It is embedded in our family and culture.  

So, when she started talking about losing the “Black card” I knew exactly what she was talking about. I am nodding my head again. The type of food our ancestors ate on the plantation evolved into what we call today as soul food.  This includes favorites like fried chicken, collard or mustard greens, okra, cornbread, sweet potatoes or yams and blackeyed peas. It also includes some kind of pork product like ham, pig’s feet, hog head cheese and the all-time favorite for many Black folks – chitlins! So, if you are a Black person and don’t eat soul food then you can lose your Black card and be called out. That is not a good situation. Believe me I have been there myself. Not for being a vegan, like Jasmine, but for my efforts in trying to lose weight. Many of these items are not healthy and/or not cooked in a healthy way. So, believe me, I get it. She also talked about how eating soul food is not just the food itself but about a sense of being and belonging. These foods are comforting and connect us to our family, history and legacy in this country. If you don’t think so, go back and watch the classic 1997 movie Soul Food.

Challenges of EatingHealthy

A head shot of Jasmine Leyva with long dark hair, smiling and leaning on one arm in a casual pose. She is wearing a brown and white sleeveless top and a long silver chain around her neck.

With this being said, it is hard for people to change and move to a healthy diet or even become a vegan for that matter. She shared about her journey to become a vegan and the ups and downs of that experience. When it comes to diet and nutrition our doctors are not well equipped to help because they get little education on it when they are in medical school. They are sometimes more apt to write out prescriptions or recommend surgery. I experienced this myself when talking to my PCP and was fortunately referred to a nutritionist.  There I learned about food groups and how food impacts the body. She also talked about food deserts and lack of access to healthy foods. As they say, “No Whole Foods in the hood!”  I could also relate to that too. I have had to get on the bus and travel miles away to find healthier options. And don’t forget about the cost of healthy food! OMG! Why does organic cost twice as much? Crazy! It takes a lot of work and energy to do all of this which I find very stressful at times.  No wonder it is so easy to grab a hamburger at McDonalds. One thing I found interesting and a bit surprising was how meat processing plants are located near minority communities. I didn’t realize that. I mean I knew about how they treat animals, the hormones and the runoff; but not the location.

No Judgement to Become a Vegan

The last thing about the documentary is that it was not judgmental. Jasmine shared her life journey, laid out the facts, and had other people share their experiences. It was not this hard-line approach. She encouraged you to start where you are. I am not ready to go totally vegan but I thought I could do something like meatless Mondays, tofu Tuesdays or salad Saturdays. You know, ease my way into a plant-based lifestyle.

Although this film is not audio described for people like me with vision loss, I still got so much out of it. I encourage you to check it out especially if you are trying to change your eating habits and curious about a vegan lifestyle. The Invisible Vegan is available to watch now on TubiTV and stream on Amazon Prime

My Treadmill is Used for Walking Not a Clothes Hanger

Empish on Treadmill

National Walking Day

One day I was having my treadmill serviced and the maintenance guy told me, “I can tell you actually use this treadmill. It is not a clothes hanger like my other customers.” I had to chuckle when he said that because he was right. Although that compliment was said some years ago, it still holds true. I walk on my treadmill as a form of staying healthy and exercise. Even more so with COVID as it helps with my mental well-being as I continue to shelter in place. I walk a couple of times a week and plan on walking today to honor National Walking Day, started by the American Heart Association as a way to encourage and educate people on the health benefits of walking.

I started walking as a form of exercise in college. Many sunny days in Florida I would lase up my tennis shoes, pop in a cassette tape into my Walkman, and start walking through my neighborhood. Other times I would walk to campus, work, visit friends or to run errands. Ah, those were the days. Walking in the warm weather with the wind blowing softly in my face, and bobbing my head to the latest hit song. When I graduated and moved to Georgia, my walking outdoors abruptly stopped because there was little to no sidewalks and even less respect to pedestrians. I remember when I first arrived reading an article in the Atlanta Journal Constitution about the number of pedestrian fatalities. Yes, that is correct. People dyeing while walking around Atlanta. Well, that wasn’t going to be me. So, I had to figure out other ways to workout. It was a struggle because shortly after I moved, I began to go blind and the traditional methods of exercise were lost to me. Yet, at the end of the day walking was still a possibility. I just had to move it indoors onto a treadmill. So, that is what I did. I purchased my first treadmill in 2003. You won’t believe it but old faithful is still going strong after all these years! I walk for about 30 minutes a couple of times a week. I have long since let go of the cassette tapes and Walkman and now listen to music on my stereo with handheld remote control. Or sometimes I will watch TV, listen to an audiobook or podcast. Here are ten benefits of why I use my treadmill for walking not a clothes hanger.

Benefits of Walking on a Treadmill

1.  Treadmills are designed to be easier on your joints, which is great for me and the arthritis in my knee.

2.  The weather doesn’t stop me from walking.

3.  I can walk anytime of the day or night.

4.  As I said before I have watched TV, listened to an audiobook, music or podcast while walking on a treadmill.

5.  Treadmills have cup holders for your water bottles, smartphone, and other items so you don’t have to carry them.

6.  Treadmills allow you to walk at a constant speed and rhythm, which can be helpful if you tend to walk too fast or have problems pacing yourself.

7.  You can hold on to the handrails for stability if you have balance problems.

8.  If you have allergies, outdoor pollution or poor walking conditions in your community walking on a treadmill is a better option than walking outside.

9.  Treadmills can keep track of heart rate, speed, time and calories burned.

10.  You can program the treadmill to set the speed, incline, and difficulty of your walk and change this whenever you want.

I have been able to take advantage of just about all of these benefits of walking on a treadmill. Additionally, my blindness doesn’t impede me from its usage, with some simple braille labeling my treadmill is fairly accessible.  As a result, my mental and physical health has improved. The ability to have a stable and consistent form of exercise at my fingertips is critically important to me. That is why my clothes stay in my closet and not hanging on my treadmill. I encourage you to make a commitment to yourself, if you haven’t already, to get some form of physical activity going. Use this day of observance as your jumping off point and get out there and walk.

Maintaining Happiness During a Pandemic

Empish sitting on mat in a yoga prayer pose

Today people are celebrating the International Day of Happiness. Is it possible to be happy or to maintain happiness during a pandemic? Yes, I think so. First let’s look at the definition. According to Merriam-Webster the word happiness means “a state of wellbeing and contentment.” Now, I take this to mean that it is a mindset or a decision you make. I can determine to be happy or not even in the middle of a crazy situation. In thinking about the decision to be happy, this year’s theme is “Keep Calm, Stay Wise and Be Kind.” I reflect on how relevant this theme is to the coronavirus and its one-year anniversary also this month.

Keep Calm. One of the biggest things that has exposed my resilience and maintained my happiness has been my ability to keep calm. It is not to say that there have not been days during this past year that I didn’t feel anxious, worried or stressed out. I remember last year dealing with my inaccessible mobile banking app and struggling with online grocery shopping. Both situations had me pulling my hair out and gritting my teeth! I ended up having to step back, regroup and figure out another solution. My mental health was not worth it in the end. I was determined to focus on the things I could control. To breathe. To remember the things to be thankful for in my life. I also stayed away from things that would cause me extra stress like watching too much news, scrolling social media and talking to people with negative energy.

Empish Holding Shopping Cart

Stay Wise. You don’t have to be old as dirt to be wise. I have learned over the years   to seek wisdom in multiple ways. Asking for help from God, people and even a frog. I also like to watch and pay attention to people around me. You can learn a lot from other people’s life experiences and mistakes. Things you can do or avoid. Lastly, seeking information from reputable sources. This I did especially when the virus struck. Checking out multiple sources of information and doing some research has helped me maintain my happiness during this pandemic. It has relieved my stress and worry. Helping me to stay focus and centered.

Be Kind. I have always been told it doesn’t take much to be kind to someone. It can be in your speech or in your actions. During this past year and even now, the coronavirus has got people on edge. Folks got a short fuse and it don’t take much these days to set someone off. Even this cancel culture where the slightest thing said or done goes viral and a person can get shutdown.  I have to remind myself that people got a lot going on. To not make the wrong assumptions and to give the benefit of the doubt. To slow down and to be kind.

Kindness can come out in being considerate and showing compassion. Many people are grieving. Whether it has been the loss of a love one or friend to COVID-19. The loss of employment or a business. The loss of experiences like proms, parties, graduations, and special celebrations. The loss of meeting with others on a regular basis. People are grieving so being kind can go a long way in showing that you care.

Empish on Recumbent Bike

I have also been able to maintain my happiness during this pandemic by indulging in things I love like reading books and watching movies. I have kept a daily work schedule and exercise routine. Having some kind of normalcy has made me happy and given me a feeling of control over my life. Realizing this too shall pass has helped me too. Of course, I have no idea how long we will continue to be in this shut down but I know it will not be forever. I know that perseverance is in order. Staying focus on the end goal of keeping safe. Practicing the 3 W’s: Wash your hands, wear a mask and watch your distance.  Lastly, knowing that the vaccine is here and we are turning a corner has given me some peace and joy.

Black Female Research Scientist and Inventor Advocates for Better Eyecare and Treatment of Blindness

A black and white photo of a young Patricia E. Bath

Patricia E. Bath

This month is Black History Month and I am so excited to share about this phenomenal woman I learned about from the podcast called Encyclopedia Womannica. I have been a listener and subscriber for a long time now, at least 2 years, and every day I learn about some incredible woman and what she has done in the world. Well, this time the woman was Patricia E. Bath. Much like our US Vice President, Kamala Harris, Bath, was the first in many categories. Let me list them for you:

1.  The first African-American to complete a residency in ophthalmology

2.  the first Black woman to receive a medical patent 

3.  The first American woman to be named a chair of ophthalmology.

Bath’s Early Years

Obviously, being the first to open the door is no joke and I can imagine that it took a lot of courage, strength and tenacity to get there. But Bath also got her grit from her parents as well. She was born in Harlem in 1942. Her father was the first Black motorman for the New York City subway system; and her mother was a domestic worker.  Both of her parents supported her curiosity about the world and interest in science. Her dad was a world traveler during his days as a merchant marine, which gave him colorful stories to share with his family. Bath was particularly intrigued with the story of Dr. Albert Schweitzer, a medical missionary, who dedicated his life to treating leprosy in the Congo.  Her mother’s contribution was using the earnings from her job to purchase Bath’s first chemistry set.

In high school she was one of a few students selected to attend a cancer research workshop sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The head of the workshop was so impressed, he included her findings in a paper he presented at a conference. Bath completed high school in two years, and went straight to Hunter College where she graduated in 1964. Next, she attended Howard Medical School in Washington, D.C.

Bath Notices Differences in Care Between Blacks and Whites

Finished with her degrees, Bath accepted an internship back home, at Harlem Hospital. The succeeding year, she also began pursuing a fellowship in ophthalmology at Columbia University. While traveling between the hospital and the university, Bath noticed a stark difference in the number of blind or visually impaired patients at Harlem’s eye clinic compared to Columbia’s despite how close the two facilities were located to each other. The one notable difference was that Harlem’s patients were largely Black while Columbia’s were mainly white.

Man Getting an Eye Exam

Drawing from her childhood curiosity, Bath led a retrospective epidemiological study. She found that blindness among the Black community was double that of whites. She concluded that high rates of blindness among African-Americans was largely due to the lack of access to care. She convinced physicians to offer surgeries at the Harlem clinic. And she proposed a new discipline called community ophthalmology. This new discipline combines elements of public health, community medicine and clinical ophthalmology to support underserved communities. Screenings were done for eye threatening conditions like glaucoma and cataracts. Volunteers were sent to senior centers and daycare facilities in the community. Children in need of glasses were identified early, giving them a better chance at school success. This discipline is still practiced worldwide today.

Bath Breaks Race and Gender Barriers

Bath began the final stage of her training at New York University In 1970. She broke a racial barrier by becoming the first African-American ophthalmology resident in American history. Shortly afterward she married a fellow physician and they had a daughter. A couple of years later Bath and her family relocated out west to California where she broke another barrier by becoming the first woman faculty member in UCLA’s Ophthalmology department. When she was hired, she was offered an office in the basement next to the lab animals. Instead of accusing her employer of discrimination Bath worked on getting more appropriate office space. By 1983, Bath was the chair of the department, and breaking yet another barrier by becoming the first woman in the US to hold that position.

Bath Invents Device to Remove cataracts

Bath believed that eyesight was a human right so in 1977, she and several colleagues created the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness. They traveled around the world training volunteers, teaching, speaking and experiencing different cultures. During her travels, the most common cause of blindness she saw was cataracts. So, she decided to do something about it and in 1981 she invented a new device and method for treatment called the  laserphaco probe. The probe is a fiber optic laser surrounded by irrigation and suction tubes. It lets surgeons to remove cataracts in a matter of minutes. Not only was the process quickly sped up, but it minimized the patient’s pain.

A color photo of an older Patricia E. Bath

During this time, Bath’s concept outpaced current technology. She spent almost five years conducting research, trials and development work. In 1988, Bath broke another barrier becoming the first Black woman doctor to receive a patent. Today, the probe is frequently used around the world, and revolutionized the way cataracts are treated. Bath used her device personally restoring vision to several people who’d been blind for over 30 years. But in 1993, she retired from her position at UCLA to focus on telemedicine. She held positions in telemedicine at her alma mater, Howard University, and at St. George’s University in Grenada. In 2001, she was appointed to the International Women in Medicine Hall of Fame. Bath died on May 30, 2019, from complications with cancer. She was 76 years old.

Adding Some Spice to My Life with a Little Braille

A white plastic two-level spice rack with a variety of spices and containers.

January is Braille Literacy Month

I would be remiss to let this month go by and not talk about braille. Although I use it sparingly it is a part of my everyday life and this month is Braille Literacy Month. This is also the birthday month of its inventor, Louis Braille. In my very first post on Triple E I shared about Braille, how he created the code and how I use it daily. I won’t rehash it here but feel free to click on the link and read it.

Back in December or maybe November I ordered a set of no-salt spices from Amazon. I was getting bored with the three options I was cooking with:  black pepper, kosher salt and paprika. Sometimes I would include other seasonings but I needed to spice up my life a bit. So, I ordered this set of 24 spices and got excited about the possibilities. I know, 24 seems like a lot to get started but I can be ambitious and adventurous when I want. Once they came in the mail I had to sit and figure out how in the world I was going to keep track of all of them. I had a lot of spices to choose from and I didn’t want to make mistakes and pick up the wrong one to season my food.  I mean, adding extra black pepper is one thing, but adding extra ground cinnamon or cumin is totally another. Sometimes I would use my sense of smell to determine the differences like sniffing garlic or chili powder. But that is not always reliable especially if I am working with spices I am not accustom to using on a regular basis. This led me to an idea! I decided to use my little braille skills to solve the identification problem.

Creating Braille Labels and Spice List

A black and white braille label gun with turn dial displaying both braille and print letters and numbers.

First, I pulled out my brand-new handy dandy braille label gun. I bought that too in December and boy did I need a new one! The old one had problems releasing the Dymo tape, the printed alphabetic numbers and letters were rubbed off and the thing was just old as dirt. Second, I got a sighted friend to come over and help me out. The one cool thing about using a braille label gun is that a blind or sighted person can use it. It has braille and printed numbers and letters on the dial. We tagged teamed the project. We created the spice list in alphabetical order to make things easy. She created labels of 1-24 and I typed up a printed list on my laptop computer. She would tell me the name of each spice and I would type it on the list. Then I would give her the assigned number and she would create the braille label.

Empish Sitting in Front of Laptop Wearing Headset with Microphone

Need Additional Info on Unfamiliar Spices

photo of a variety of spices displayed in tubs on a shelf in a shop

Now my spices are ready to go. Each one has a braille number that corresponds to my electronic printed list that I have stored on Dropbox. Yet I still gotta little more work to do. As I mentioned I bought these spices to attempt something new and there are definitely some I haven’t tried or even heard of. “Anyone know how to cook with ground turmeric?”  “Has anyone heard of Provencal aromatics or seafood aromatics?” If you are scratching your head or furrowing your eyebrow, join the club because I am right there with you. This means back to my computer to do some research. Next, I will be going online and searching around the internet for info on the ones that are unfamiliar and learning how to cook with them. Watch me learn and get ready to burn in the kitchen! Intimidation is not in my vocabulary and I am up for the challenge. I am excited about this new phase; and how using a little braille has added some spice to my life.

Being an Introvert Helps Me Survive COVID-19

Wall of Book Shelves

Reading with My Ears Book Review

Although a vaccine for COVID-19 is on the way this pandemic is not over by a long shot. There are still a lot of unanswered questions that we have to deal with. As for me I am trying to learn as much as I can about the vaccine. I am still wearing my facemask. I am still practicing social distancing and sheltering in place. This all leads me to something very interesting I have learned about myself over the past year. This new but old discovery is that I am an introvert. I sort of kind of knew this about myself for awhile yet when this pandemic struck and we had to shut down I found myself really being okay with it. Don’t get me wrong, I do have my days when I get a little squirrely but for the most part, I am fine with being quarantined at home.

I spoke to a fellow blogger, Steph McCoy over at Bold, Blind Beauty, about it. As I shared my thoughts and feelings, she commiserated with me and recommended a book for me to read that would help me figure some things out. Of course, I am a book lover and at home, so I got time to read, right? This was right up my alley.  So, I downloaded the audio version of The Introvert Advantage: Making the Most of Your Inner Strengths by Marti Olsen Laney and got to learning more about myself.

Summary and Goals of the Book

Before I share with you some of the key points, I gathered from the book, let me give you a quick summary from Bookshare. “At least one out of four people prefers to avoid the limelight, tends to listen more than they speak, feels alone in large groups, and requires lots of private time to restore their energy. They’re introverts, and here is the book to help them boost their confidence while learning strategies for successfully living in an extrovert world. After dispelling common myths about introverts-they’re not necessarily shy, aloof, or antisocial–The Introvert Advantage explains the real issues. Introverts are hardwired from birth to focus inward, so outside stimulation-chitchat, phone calls, parties, office meetings-can easily become too much. The Introvert Advantage dispels introverts’ belief that something is wrong with them and instead helps them recognize their inner strengths-their analytical skills, ability to think outside the box, and strong powers of concentration. It helps readers understand introversion and shows them how to determine where they fall on the introvert/extrovert continuum. It provides tools to improve relationships with partners, kids, colleagues, and friends, offering dozens of tips. Finally, it shows how to not just survive, but thrive-how to take advantage of the introvert’s special qualities to create a life that’s just right for the introvert temperament, to discover new ways to expand their energy reserves, and even how, when necessary, to confidently become a temporary extrovert.” After reading that detailed summary, I knew this book was for me and was a great suggestion from my friend. Now that I have finished the book, I am ready to share the little gems I learned with you about being an introvert and how it is helping me survive COVID-19.

As I was reading there were three goals the author wanted to achieve:

1. Determine if you are an introvert or not

2. How to understand if you are

3. How to nurture your valuable introversion

I Am an Introvert

After reading through the first couple of chapters I realized pretty quickly that I am an introvert. Some of the characteristics are that we have ongoing dialogue with ourselves; and we think too much. Introverts walk around with lots of thoughts and feelings in their head. Yep, that me, especially at 3 a.m. in the morning. That is when I get my best writing and blogging ideas. Who knew?

"Quiet Tea Time" by Kirinohana is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

I also realized that it probably started from my childhood. Funny how so many things in life come from when you are a kid. As I thought back to those days I remember before my siblings came along, I spent a lot of time alone and by myself. Playing solitary games and reading books. Two memories stand out specifically. The first memory was selecting toys from the Sears Christmas Wish Book that I could play mostly by myself. Some kind of way I already knew as an only child that I needed to do that. Second memory is winning the summer reading contest in the 6th or 7th grade and feeling bittersweet about it. I was glad that I won but sad that I had time to read all those books. I realized   that I needed to spruce up my life with some other activities besides reading.

Socializing as an Introvert

I have even seen it in my friendships and romantic relationships. I enjoy hanging out with friends but only for a while then my energy starts to go down. Before the pandemic if I was at a get together, I would set a time for about an hour or two because that was about my limit. Not that I didn’t like the people I was with I would just get tired and want to go home. Now with the men in my life, I tend to date guys who are very outgoing and charismatic. I figure it’s that old saying that opposites attract. But sometimes it would get stressful and complicated because the guy I was dating was ready to roll but I was winding down. I would want a quiet night at home but he would want to hit the town.

I also noticed it with crowds especially after I went blind. I don’t care for large crowds anymore because of the sensory overload and sometimes I feel a little bit anxious. No large auditoriums. No mega stadiums. No large crowded and busy malls. Small groups work best for me. This has come in very handy during the pandemic because there is less chance of spreading the virus if I stay in a little group.

Even better if I stay home and that is what I have done the bulk of the time.

Working as an Introvert

A couple of years ago I made a career change and started working from home. I am a freelance writer and blogger–a quiet and isolating type of work life. I am self-motivated, set my own schedule and don’t need supervision. Unbeknownst to me this job shift complemented my introversion.  Then the pandemic came and we all had to stay home. So, I am reading online about people having to work remotely while I was already doing that. It was a lot of change for people and I felt empathy but I personally was not struggling with it. I began to question why and now I know why. Being an introvert has not only helped me with my overall career but also my blogging during this pandemic. I have written multiple blog posts about how people can successfully work from home. Many of those posts were ideas that came from my personal experience along with research and keeping up with trends.

Final Take Aways and Last Thoughts

The final take-aways are pacing myself and taking on extrovert skills. The last couple of chapters of the book were encouraging and reaffirming as they delt with self-esteem and self-confidence. It is okay to be an introvert. That there is nothing wrong with me and the way I move in the world. I really felt good about that because I have felt that my behavior was not always supported. The author took time to explain pacing and energy levels, how they work and how to restore them. I use to think that taking long naps and cuddling up in my bed to read all the time was a bad thing. But after reading this book I see that it is a part of being an introvert. That it is a part of restoring my energy levels and especially since I have a sleeping disorder. This is called nurture your nature.

But there are times when you will have to take on the skills of an extrovert. I have done that many times in my life. I have friends that would even argue me down with the writing of this post to say that I am not an introvert because I am so friendly, talkative and outgoing. Yes, those things are true but I do them because the situation warrants it. If I am at a gathering or event, I will get out of myself and engage with people there. I will not be a wall flower. I will put my best foot forward, smile and be a Chatty Pattie. I now realize that takes a lot of energy and that is why I stay for a short time and leave. When I get home, I go straight to the bed or sofa to rest. 

This book has been a confirmation for me. I can identify who and what I am. I am able to take better care of myself. As they say knowing is half the battle. Now that I know that I am an introvert I can use this to help me survive COVID-19.

Year 2020 is a Wrap!

Fireworks Display

Well, y’all the year 2020 is a wrap! And boy what a year it has been for all of us. Who what have known all the things that happened this year? Wild fires, hurricanes and floods, police brutality, racial tension, distressing elections and of course the big kahuna COVID-19.  I struggle sometimes just to remember what happened last week with so much going on! I am not going to sit here and write one of those top-10-year-in-review type blog posts because you can easily go online and read that already. But what I am going to do is make a meager effort to do a mini recap of some of the things I blogged about here on Triple E.

I started this blog in January of this year and I was able to successfully write a blog post on a regular basis. My goal was to write a post weekly. I didn’t quite make it but I came very close with 50 published posts and with 52 weeks in a year that is not bad! Actually, that is a major accomplishment with all the craziness going on, managing this blog on my own and having a visual disability. So, I am going to pat myself on the back for this one! Woohoo!

Empish and the Author, Noel Holston at Library Book Signing

One of my first post focused on reading and books. I attended a book signing at the library about a man who experience deafness. I was so taken by his story I not only went to the signing, chatted and took a photo with him afterward, but wrote a book review called Life After Deaf. This one post led me to write many more during the year on this topic of books and the devices I use to enjoy them.  I even connected Black History Month with a book I read on Haban Girma who was the first deafblind black woman to graduate From Harvard. One cool thing about blogging is that you can revise, revamp and reprint old post from the past. I did that a couple of times but noted it specifically when I reposted a review on the March Trilogy by Congressman John Lewis to honor him when he died this year.

Empish at Concession Stand Purchasing Popcorn

Besides my love for books and reading, watching movies runs a close second. Before the coronavirus caused the theaters to shut down, I would go to the movies a couple of times a week. But all of that changed in mid-March and I settled for watching movies at home only. Even when my AMC theater reopened, I decided to not go back and I shared why in a post.

Empish Sitting in Front of Laptop Wearing Headset with Microphone

I have been able to watch movies at home thanks to accessible technology. I wrote several posts this year on how important  this is from being my own tech support to the anniversaries of the ADA and GAAD.

 

The biggest technology change for me this year has been using Zoom videoconferencing. Prior to the coronavirus I used Zoom for one of my monthly book clubs but my usage increased tremendously. This year I started using Zoom for telemedical appointments, exercise classes, socializing and volunteering. I have been Zooming all over the place this year! Unfortunately, all my technology experiences were not positive and I hit some major road blocks. I struggled with depositing paper checks with my bank’s mobile app and my advocacy efforts didn’t provide any relief. I aired out my frustrations here on Triple E. Although I didn’t get a satisfactory resolution from the bank, I was able to from the issuer of the checks.

I felt okay about that and I realized during this COVID-19 crisis that my mental and physical health were more important than ever before.  I wrote about managing my anxiety,  exercising and strengthening my body at home, maintaining good eyecare, wrestling with my lack of sleep, and grieving during a pandemic. Due to all that was happening I made more efforts to keep a positive attitude and pursue happiness in the small things.

Empish Working in Home Office

Now it is time to say goodbye to year 2020. To let go of all that transpired this year and look ahead to the new year. I am excited about the possibilities of what this next year will bring. I have set more goals for Triple E. Writing more interesting stories about blindness and visual impairment. More reviews on books that I have read.  More of my views on current topics, technology and much, much more. So, stay tuned! I look forward to the journey and you coming with me. Let us all have a Happy New Year!

Lessons I Learned from a Frog

A green frog getting ready to jump

Once upon a time there were four frogs. They went for a little hop around town. There was a big hole in front of them, but, unfortunately, they didn’t see it until it was too late. All four of the frogs fell into the hole! Immediately after fallin into the hole, the frogs started jumping trying to get out. After a while, two of the frogs got tired and gave up. The other two frogs continued to jump, trying to get out of the hole. After many hours, the third frog also gave up. Only one frog continued to try and jump out of the hole. The other frogs cheered him on for a while, but when jumping out of the hole seemed impossible, they started to call him names. Hours passed and the little frog continued jumping, trying to get out of the hole. The other frogs continued to ridicule him, calling him all kinds of bad names, and saying, “Just give up!  It’s not going to happen!  You are wasting your time.” But the little frog continued to jump. And as he continued to jump, his little legs got stronger and stronger. His jumps became higher and higher, until one day he jumped right out of that hole. Oh, it was something to behold! Well, when he got out of the hole of course there were other frogs up top, waiting to find out how he got out of such a deep hole. The other frogs were bombarding him with questions, but the little frog never said a word. The little frog began to leave.  The other frogs went calling after him, but he did not turn around. They soon discovered that the frog was deaf. He never heard a word that they were saying and neither did he hear the other frogs ridiculing him and telling him that it was impossible for him to jump out of the hole. His deafness became his strength; it was the reason he got out of the hole. 

This story of the frog was adapted from a folk tale and shared with me by a former co-worker when I worked at the Center for the Visually Impaired. Occasionally, I go back and read this story to gather encouragement, strength and inspiration. Lately there has been so much negative and stressful stuff going on that I pulled it out of my files yet again. But this time I wanted to share with you along with a couple of valuable lessons I have learned.

Lesson in Perseverance

The frog taught me about pushing through and persevering. When he realized his predicament, he never stopped trying to improve his situation and get out of it. He kept jumping and jumping. Right now, a lot of us, including myself are dealing with COVID-19 fatigue. This virus has got us down and singing the blues in major ways.  But we have got to keep wearing our mask, washing our hands, practicing social distancing and push on.

Additionally, I am dealing with political exhaustion. I will be voting yet again in January for the Georgia U.S. Senate seat. The number of phone calls, text messages, TV ads, and mailbox flyers has got my head spinning. I understand the importance of this runoff election and how critical it is but boy am I tired! Then on top of that the political bickering and fighting over the recent presidential election results has been a bit too much for me personally

Lesson in Doing What You Do

The frog did what he always did. Frogs jump and hop around. That is what God created and designed them to do. The difference is that he did more of it and didn’t stop. For me I realize that to succeed in my goals, I need to continue to do what I do. God has given me talents and skills that are specific to me.  I don’t need to sit around thinking and pondering about it.  I don’t need to look at other people. Just do what I need to do and things will happen for me. Just like the frog, when he kept jumping his legs got stronger making it easier and better for him to ultimately get out of that hole.

Lesson in Turning Off the Noise and Distractions

The frog didn’t pay attention to the negativity around him. He was laser focus on his goal which was to get out of that hole. Even when he got out, he stayed fixated and didn’t even stop to conversate about it with other frogs but kept moving on. He didn’t get distracted and caught up in the chatter and noise. There is so much around to sidetrack me from my purpose. It can be easy to get off track and lose sight of the end game. But I have to remind myself don’t get caught up in the noise, drama, craziness and disruptions in the world.

So, after reading about the frog. what powerful lessons did you learn? Or did this story just reinforce what you already knew that you needed to do? How can a little frog help you to have a better life?

Giving Thanks During a Pandemic

a Thanksgiving horn of plenty with a rainbow of fruits and vegetables

This year’s Thanksgiving Day will be one for the history books. The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade will be virtual. We are encouraged by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to have small gatherings, remotely  or none  at all. Black Friday store sales will be more online to avoid large crowds. And even the iconic holiday classic Charlie Brown’s Thanksgiving special didn’t air on regular  TV but on PBS and Apple +. Additionally, these last few months have been hard, stressful and even depressing for a lot of people. Many of us have been isolated at home, dealing with economic ups and downs, work challenges, political and racial unrest. It has been an incredible year and that’s putting it mildly! We still got a whole month left to go before 2020 is over. Yet in the midst of all of this having an attitude of gratitude is so important to maintain hope and resilience. Thanksgiving Day is today and there are so many things to be grateful for during this pandemic.

To start off. The fact that I can write this blog post about being thankful in the first place! I can start right here because a year ago this blog didn’t even exist. I was working my way toward it and prior to it was just an idea that I had in my head. But here I am a year later; producing something that I am very thankful and proud to possess. This blog and website have stretched me. It has been challenging and wonderful all at the same time.

Another thing I think about is my basic necessities. I remember when this pandemic started and everyone was panic shopping toilet tissue. You remember that don’t you? Well, it seems that has slowed down a bit, or at least where I live. Online grocery shopping is still touch and go but when I go in person, I do get the items I need and I am so grateful for that. I do remember when the shelves were bare to empty and that has improved. I go into the grocery store more grateful now, especially when I see an item that was out of stock for a long time.

I am grateful for my telemedical appointments with doctors. During this pandemic I have been able to continue my medical care and have Zoom calls with my doctors. Additionally, In the last few months I have been meeting with a physical therapist to help with my right knee pain. As a result of those visits the pain is virtually gone and I have learned how to strengthen my body, improve my posture and balancing. I feel so much better not just physically but mentally too. I realized that I don’t have to live in pain. For a long time, I would just push through and now I know that is unnecessary and unwise.

During this pandemic many people have struggled with finding things to do to occupy their time. Well, for me it has been the opposite. I am so grateful for a full, rich and rewarding life. I have plenty of things to do. A variety of things that I can focus on each day-from my writing work, to reading interesting books, listening to a wide variety of podcasts, watching audio described movies and keeping up with friends and family. I got a lot on my plate. I have actually had to work on scaling back and learning ways to remove things and not allow stuff to stress me out if I don’t get to it.

So, today I encourage you to pause and think about what you are grateful for. It is easy to focus on all the things that are going wrong and are not happening. But take this time to concentrate on the goodness in the world. The things that bring you joy and pleasure. The people that you love and cherish. Even during a pandemic there are plenty of things to be thankful for in life.

Blindness and Disability are Popular Themes for October

The fall is my favorite season and time of the year. The weather is cooler. The autumn colors of brown, orange, golden yellow, dark red and green are on display. October is the month when all of this jumps off. But one other thing I recently noticed is the number of blind and disabled observations happening at this time too. Not sure why this is the case but I couldn’t let another day go by without pointing them out. Or at least the ones I know about.

Man Getting an Eye Exam

1.  World Sight Day is held on the second Thursday of October every year and aims to focus global attention on vision impairment and blindness. There is a different theme every year, with many of those who mark the Day taking the opportunity to both celebrate achievements to date and advocate for increasing attention towards eye care.  According to the World Health Organization 1 billion people around the world have a preventable vision impairment or one that has yet to be addressed.  Reduced or absent eyesight can have major and long-lasting effects on all aspects of life, including daily personal activities, interacting with the community, school and work opportunities and the ability to access public services.

2.  White Cane Safety Day is observed nationally on October 15th. It was a law passed to protect white cane pedestrians by giving them the right of way and recognizing that the white cane was a symbol of blindness. President Lyndon Johnson signed it into law in 1964.

3.  Blind Americans Equality Day. In 2011, White Cane Safety Day was also named Blind Americans Equality Day by President Barack Obama. The mission is to celebrate the continuing achievements of blind and visually impaired Americans and reaffirm the commitment to advancing their complete social and economic integration.

4.  Meet the Blind Month is hosted by the National Federation of the Blind every October. Throughout the month, members conduct a variety of outreach activities in their local communities. Many of these activities focus on White Cane Awareness Day, lived experiences with problem solving, self-confidence and intersectionality.

5.  National Disability Employment Awareness Month acknowledges the ingenuity people with disabilities bring to America’s workplaces. Each October NDEAM celebrates America’s workers with disabilities and reminds employers of the importance of inclusive hiring practices. In 1945, Congress declared the first week of October “National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week.” In 1962, the word “physically” was dropped to include individuals with all types of disabilities. Congress expanded the week to a month in 1988, and changed the commemoration to National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

6.  Blind Awareness Month  was created by The Little Rock Foundation in Voorhees, New Jersey to promote improving blind and visually impaired children’s lives. The goal is to educate the public about good eye health, and treatment of eye disorders.  Inspire people with stories of the blind and their accomplishments. Advocate for research, resources and laws that benefit the blind community.

After doing my research I would dare to say that October is the month of the blind. I would encourage you to take some time and learn more, volunteer or donate to an organization serving the blind community.